Monday, November 14, 2016

A Russian KV1 at 1/32 scale


The mighty KV1 was the most powerful heavy tank of the early war period…on paper.

Even though the Germans were badly surprised at first, the KV was never in a position to hold back the invasion of Russia. 



KV1 at 1/32
The beast with a green color...not historically accurate but fun



As quoted in Wikipedia:

KV1 at 1/32The KV's strengths included armor that was impenetrable by any tank-mounted weapon then in service except at point-blank range, that it had good firepower, and that it had good traction on soft ground. It also had serious flaws, all of which were rectified with the introduction of the KV-1S: it was difficult to steer, the transmission (which was a twenty-year-old Caterpillar design) was unreliable (and was known to have to been shifted with a hammer), and the ergonomics were poor, with limited visibility and no turret basket. Furthermore, at 45 tons, it was simply too heavy. This severely impacted the maneuverability, not so much in terms of maximum speed, as through inability to cross many bridges medium tanks could cross.

My brother chose to make the 1941 model with the cast turret. 



KV1 at 1/32



To do the work, he used George Bradford series World war II AFV plans.  The book Russian Armored Vehicles provided scaled plan of the KV.  It helps a lot to represent all the details of that tank.


 Eight were built in two colors.

KV1 at 1/32
...that's the other color more realistic




KV1 at 1/32
The KV with TSSD russian troops.


KV1 at 1/32
Our KV's haven't fight yet.  Those scenes were made for propaganda purposes only (!)






Friday, September 2, 2016

A pioneer boat at 1/32


When a saw those hot dog containers in a dollar store, I immediately think of a kind of boat; a pioneer boat. 

I always love those discoveries; going through the aisle of the store and finding something new, something with a potential of becoming a new project.


The final result is a cool pioneer boat. 





The material needed is:


- Hot dog container





- Piece of bath mat
- Popsicle sticks
- Hot glue






Let's look at it at many angles





It offers a good protection on water because of the high broadside.  






I am sure Robert Redford caracter in "A bridge too far" would have appreciate my boat to cross the Waal river








The down side of that feature is that the boat is not totally at scale.  Between you and me, it would be difficult to row that kind of boat in real.  Anyhow, my army men already standardized it!



Thursday, January 21, 2016

Stug Panzer at 1/32


The Stug Panzer is one of the most interesting tanks of WWII and for many reasons.

Let's look at them courtesy of Wikipedia

"The Sturmgeschütz III (StuG III) assault gun was Germany's most produced armoured fighting vehicle during World War II. It was built on the chassis of the proven Panzer III tank, replacing the turret with a fixed superstructure mounting a more powerful gun. Initially intended as a mobile, armoured light gun for direct-fire support for infantry, the StuG III was continually modified, and much like the later Jagdpanzer, was widely employed as a tank destroyer."

"While the StuG III was considered self-propelled artillery, it was not initially clear which land combat arm of the Wehrmacht Heer would handle the new weapon.(…). It was agreed, after a discussion, it would best be employed as part of the artillery arm.
As the StuG III was designed to fill an infantry close support combat role, early models were fitted with a low-velocity 75 mm StuK 37 L/24 gun to destroy soft-skin targets and fortifications. After the Germans encountered the Soviet KV-1 and T-34 tanks, the StuG III was first equipped with a high-velocity 75 mm StuK 40 L/43 main gun (Spring 1942) and in Autumn 1942 with the slightly longer 75 mm StuK 40 L/48 gun. These versions were known as the Sturmgeschütz 40 Ausführung F, Ausf. F/8 and Ausf. G."

Stug panzer
The two beasts :  with the long and the short barrel

Stug panzer
A good example of an early Stug panzer with the short 75 mm


DSG Argentina Deetail recast as a comparaison 




Stug panzer
The same tanks with TSSD


Stug panzer
TSSD again




Stug panzer





Stug panzer





Stug panzer
The two Stugs with a Panzer III as a comparaison




What about a short film about the real thing?  I know, I cheat because it's a replica.





If you like the article, feel free to write comments about it.  Thanks!


Tuesday, December 8, 2015

Airfix Russian infantery 1/32 scale review


The Airfix russian infantery are not new figures.  They were molded years ago.  Considering that I just bought a set and I haven't found a lot of reviews on them, I decided to go forward with my own.

Airfix russian infantery 1/32 scale






Exact Scale

1/35


Molding

Clean molding, nothing to say. 


Type of plastic

Hard plastic. 


Color

Dark brown


Airfix russian infantery 1/32 scale

Airfix russian infantery 1/32 scale










Pose



Airfix russian infantery 1/32 scale


Airfix russian infantery 1/32 scale
Airfix russian infantery 1/32 scale

Airfix russian infantery 1/32 scale
Airfix russian infantery 1/32 scale


Airfix russian infantery 1/32 scale





Airfix russian infantery 1/32 scale



Airfix russian infantery 1/32 scale

Cost

10.99 US $ (2015)


Pros

A lot of fire power 
Cool officer pose
Perfect “Russian” brown color
Low cost 


Cons

Brittle figure for wargaming

Conclusion


Good addition to Petite Infanterie Russian line-up.  We only could wish that the original soft plastic version still exists

Thursday, October 8, 2015

Operation Barbarossa at 1/32 (episode 1)



We were looking for a short wargame which could be played in few hours and we came up with the episode 1 of Operation Barbarossa.


The plot is as follow:  a German motorized column is going forward a few weeks after the original attack.  The column will face entrenched Russians along the road.  The Russians troops have been ordered to defend a strategic stone bridge at all cost.



The strategic stone bridge












 A 76 mm F22 garding the road








The German column










Tuesday, July 14, 2015

A classic stone building at 1/32



Buildings are a cool thing to have when you do war gaming at 1/32.

It’s especially true when you use Nerf gun to emulate artillery bombardment.  If you built your building in such a way that it could be destructible, you ended up with a lot of fun.

This being said, I wanted this time to build something that has the classic look of a stone building.


To do so, I use foam blocks.  It was the first time I use those blocks I bought at the dollar store.

classic stone building at 1/32


I can say that they are very handy.  Once painted, they emulate well stone/concrete construction.


I let you see by yourself.




classic stone building at 1/32





classic stone building at 1/32


classic stone building at 1/32




classic stone building at 1/32



What about a historical picture of the stone building?  

classic stone building at 1/32

Let's get back to color!

classic stone building at 1/32


That's the result after being hit by a number of big caliber shells


classic stone building at 1/32

classic stone building at 1/32

classic stone building at 1/32